Larput Place

7 12 2008

larputplace1

Photos taken January 2004

Larput Place counts itself as one of Cheltenham’s weirder named streets, and there’s no provenance (as far as I know) to suggest where it comes from. No name is shown for it on early maps and the first building certificate to be issued here gave the name as Lorpot Place.

It’s one of the grid lines of Victorian terraces which make up the St Paul’s area, lying a short distance to the west of St Paul’s church. Like many of the streets around here, it was laid out some time before 1840 and developed piecemeal, a short terrace at a time, by different developers, until all the little groups and pairs of houses got joined up with each other and became one long terrace with an erratic roofline and varying proximity to the pavement.

Originally Larput Place referred only to a terrace of five houses at the east end of the street. They appear in the 1841 census as Larbeth Place. But at some point the name became extended to the whole street, which joins Victoria Street at one end (on a fiercely sharp bend) and Hanover Street at the other. Among the individual terraces built here were Ebenezer Cottages, St Paul’s Cottages, Hungerford Cottages, Albert Cottages and Rehobeth Cottage, but it’s hard to tell exactly which was where. It’s not all Victorian either. The row of seven houses at the far west end (some of which are shown in the photo above) were built in 1997, and styled to blend in.

In the years before the First World War Rehobeth Cottage was the home of the Bridgman family whose son Frederick (like so many other Cheltenham men) was killed on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

The picture below, looking towards Hanover Street, shows the mismatch of housing which gives the street its character. The lampost encased in wisteria looks a bit bedraggled in winter but is one of the most beautiful sights in Cheltenham in April when it flowers.

larputplace2

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One response

5 11 2012
Muriel Hamer

My grandfather was the Frederick John Bridgman who lived in one of the cottages in Larput Place and the Frederick Ewart Bridgman would have been my uncle.

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