Old names

Over the years a number of street names in Cheltenham have been changed. There were also a lot of individual house and terrace names to be found in old documents and maps which have since fallen out of usage, or been forgotten when the houses ceased to exist. Here’s your guide through the confusion.

Entries are divided into four lists:
Renamed Streets (still exist but under a different name)
Obsolete Names & Lost Places (streets, places and names which have gone)
Demolished Houses (major buildings which have gone)
Vanished Pubs (closed, demolished or renamed inns)
Spa buildings are treated separately, so if you’re looking for those try the Spa Town article above.

As with everything else on this site, these lists make no pretence of being complete but are in a process of being improved and expanded.

RENAMED STREETS

  • Albert Street – there were two Albert Streets in Cheltenham, one of which was renamed Charles Street in the 1950s
  • America Passage – now called Albion Walk
  • Andover Place – now part of Andover Road
  • Argyll Place – now part of Grafton Road
  • Argyll Road – now College Gate
  • Argyll Road North – now Argyll Road
  • Bannister’s Lane – early combined name for what is now Henrietta Street and Dunalley Street
  • Bathurst Place – now East Approach Drive (to Pittville Pump Room)
  • Bean Street – now Clare Place
  • Beaufort Place – now West Approach Drive (to Pittville Pump Room)
  • Beckingsale’s Passage – now incorporated into Normal Terrace
  • Belmont Place – now Belmont Road
  • Belmore Street – now Belmore Place
  • Blackie Lane – alternative old name for Dark Lane in Swindon Village
  • Bloomsbury Place – off Lower High Street. No longer exists. Totally wiped out c.1906 when the Honeybourne railway line was built
  • Charles Street – not to be confused with the current Charles Street off Tewkesbury Road, this one was in Leckhampton and is now St Phillip’s Street
  • Clare Parade – now Kew Place
  • Clare Terrace – now Clare Street
  • Cleeve RoadEvesham Road was called the Cleeve Road until the late 19th century, and the name may have stuck for a while after
  • Coach Road – on line of present Lower Mill Street
  • Coltham Lane – now Hales Road. Previously known as Gallows Lane or Hangman’s Lane
  • Commercial Road – now Suffolk Road
  • Cottage Place – on line of present Monson Avenue
  • Councillors Alley – now Oxford Passage
  • Dagmar Terrace – now Dagmar Road
  • Day Lane – or Day’s Lane, now Grove Street
  • Dunalley Parade – in addition to the present Dunalley Parade, the name once also included a row of 12 houses along St Paul’s Road
  • Engine House Lane – now Rodney Road
  • Fleece Lane – now Henrietta Street, named after the Fleece Inn which stood on its corner
  • Gallipot Lane – most likely what is now Trafalgar Lane, named after Galipot Farm (see below), a popular gathering place which once occupied the Suffolk Square area
  • Gallows Lane – very old name for what is now Hales Road. Named after the Gallows Oak which once stood at the crossroads with London Road, shown on 1806 map but gone by 1820
  • Grafton Road, The – now Gratton Street
  • Grafton Street – now part of Grafton Road
  • Grafton Terrace – incorporated into Ashford Road
  • Gratton Terrace – now Gratton Street
  • Greyhound Lane – now part of North Street, the section running alongside Boots
  • Grosvenor Place – now part of Albion Street, opposite Grosvenor Place South
  • Gyde’s Terrace – now Grosvenor Street
  • Hangman’s Lane – very old name for what is now Hales Road, see Gallows Lane
  • Hermitage Place – now Hermitage Street
  • Hewlett Street – original name for the lower part of Hewlett Road between London Road and Duke Street. An old ‘Hewlett Road’ sign still survives on the wall of the Fiery Angel pub, marking the former boundary
  • Hewletts Place – alternate version of Hewlett Place
  • Hewletts Road – alternate version of Hewlett Road
  • Humphris’s Lane – 18th century name for North Street
  • Lansdown Terrace – now Malvern Road. Name still applies to the long terrace in Malvern Road and the service lane behind it
  • Lansdown Villas – now Lansdown Parade
  • Lippiate Street – now Tivoli Place in Andover Road
  • Lower Grafton Street – now part of Ashford Road
  • Maidenhorn Lane – the part of St Paul’s Road between Folly Lane and Swindon Road
  • Manchester Street – earlier name for the western end of Clarence Street between Ambrose Street and St George’s Place
  • Manchester Walk – formerly a section of narrow street between Knapp Road and Clarence Street
  • Meeting House Lane – an old name (in use late 18th century) for Manchester Walk, i.e. the street between Knapp Road and Clarence Street
  • Millbrook Terrace – original name for Old Millbrook Terrace
  • Mount Pleasant – now part of Fairview Road. Name may also have applied to part of Winchcombe Street at one time.
  • Murder Lane – informal name for a previously anonymous service lane, now given the more respectable name of Wellesley Road. Name arose from the murder of Emily Gardner in December 1871 at the north-east end of the lane
  • New Gloucester Road – initial name for current Lansdown Road
  • Old Cemetery Road – earlier name for Market Street, named because the Winston Churchill Memorial Gardens were formerly a cemetery
  • Old Workhouse Lane – originally called Workhouse Lane as the workhouse was there, but acquired the clarifying ‘Old’ when the Union Workhouse was built in St Paul’s. Its surviving stretch is now called Knapp Lane
  • Oxstalls Lane – uncertain, but probably an earlier name for what is now Rodney Road
  • Painswick Lawn – the southern section of Painswick Road, where it joins Suffolk Road
  • Park Crescent – non-existent – was marked on some maps as a projected development within The Park, which never happened
  • Park Road – the south end of Park Place
  • Park Street – now Upper Park Street. Not to be confused with the other Park Street off the Lower High Street
  • Philadelphia Street – early name for Columbia Street, originating as a field name before the Fairview area was developed
  • Pilford Lane – early name (medieval in origin) for a section of the Old Bath Road in Charlton Kings
  • Pittville Terrace – now the western end of Clarence Road, includes the terrace where Gustav Holst was born
  • Promenade Place – the section of the inner ring road which runs behind the Promenade
  • Regent Place – section of Swindon Road between Dunalley Street and Brunswick Street, or the terrace that once existed there, long ago demolished
  • Regent Terrace – a small stub of a street existing in 1834 off Swindon Road which was subsequently extended to form St George’s Street
  • Retreat Place – now Montpellier Retreat
  • Rutland Street – now the south section of Brunswick Street, renamed following 1930s slum clearance, probably because it had a ‘bad name’
  • Sandfield Road – renamed Arle Road
  • Sandford Mead Road – section of Keynsham Road between the River Chelt and Sandford Road
  • School Lane – now Highbury Lane
  • Segrave Place – now Pittville Lawn, the section immediately behind the gates
  • St Leger’s Lane – 18th century or earlier name for Winchcombe Street
  • St George’s Terrace – now the south side of St James’s Square
  • St Paul’s Street – the section now called St Paul’s Street South
  • Six Chimneys Lane – now Arle Avenue. Name changed 1930s by residents’ petition.
  • Stanhope Street – now optimistically called Hope Street
  • Stills Lane – now St George’s Place, renamed c.1800
  • Suffolk Lawn – older name for Lypiatt Road, though strictly speaking it only referred to the houses on its east side, which are a couple of decades older than the terrace on the west side, and were built as part of the Suffolk Square development
  • Swan Lane – old name for a stretch of Winchcombe Street which went at least as far as the Pittville gates, where there was formerly a turnpike. Named after the Swan Inn on the corner of Winchcombe Street and the High Street which was built in 1725 and gone by 1800 (not to be confused with the Old Swan Inn further down)
  • Swindon Place – on the site of the Post Office in Poole Way. Whole street wiped off the map following 1930s slum clearance
  • Tangent Alley – another name for Somerset Passage which runs along the side of St Greg’s church
  • Thirlestaine Lane – now northern end of Naunton Lane
  • Tinderbox Lane – now Fairfield Road
  • Union Street – in addition to the current Union Street in Fairview, the name formerly applied to what is now Upper Bath Street and also, quite separately, to Bethesda Street. The last two were renamed to reduce the considerable confusion
  • Upper Sandford Street – early name for Thirlestaine Road
  • Victoria Place – now Victoria Retreat
  • Victoria Street – not to be confused with the current Victoria Street in St Paul’s, this name was once applied to the part of Fairview Road between Victoria Retreat and Hewlett Road, renamed to avoid confusion
  • Wellington Grove – now Marle Hill Parade
  • Wellington Passage – once a passage off Albion Street, now destroyed
  • Wellington Place – now Wellington Street
  • Whaddon Lane – now Whaddon Road
  • Whitcombe Place – alternative spelling of Witcomb Place
  • White Hart Road – now White Hart Street
  • Winchcomb Street – alternative spelling of Winchcombe Street. At the High Street end, an old cast iron sign still shows this old spelling
  • Windarse – or Windsarse. Yes really, that was an early 18th century name for what is now Sandy Lane in Charlton Kings. Later adapted to Windlass.
  • Windsor Terrace – now Windsor Street
  • Wood’s Road – early name for College Road, which was built by Sir Matthew Wood
  • Workhouse Lane – now Knapp Lane, and much truncated

OBSOLETE NAMES, LOST PLACES

  • Admiral’s Buildings – about 7 houses off Winchcombe Street, behind the High Street
  • Albion Mews – once occupied the site of the Odeon Cinema
  • Alstone Terrace – a vanished street of only 5 or so houses, at the top end of Gloucester Road opposite Market Street. Now Tesco’s car park
  • Anchor Brewery – although long closed, the buildings in Warwick Place were the best surviving example of Cheltenham’s Regency breweries – until a large portion was shamefully demolished at the end of 2008. The corner building still survives, with a lovely fanlight over the front door with a lantern set into it.
  • Ark Gardens – area of land on which the Moors estate is now built
  • Arkell’s Farm – see Byrche’s Farm
  • Ashling Villas – 19-29 London Road
  • Bath Hotel – 14 Albion Street, renamed several times
  • Bath Mews – off Bath Road on the site of present Cedar Court Road
  • Bath Place – demolished row of houses in Bath Road opposite the Playhouse, some of which were on the site of Bath Road car park.
  • Bath Villas – houses in Bath Road
  • Bays Hill Villas – houses at north end of Bayshill Road
  • Bayshill Parade – nos. 153-61 St George’s Road, either side of Queen’s Retreat
  • Bayshill Terrace – the terrace in St George’s Road now occupied by the George Hotel
  • Bedford Buildings – terrace in Clarence Street, demolished for the building of the public library in 1887
  • Belle Vue Hotel – on the High Street where it joins Berkeley Place. Originally a private house called the Belle Vue, it became a hotel for many years (first the Belle Vue Hotel then the Irving Hotel) and survives as residential flats, now named Cedar Court
  • Belle Vue Place – houses in the upper High Street opposite Berkeley Place
  • Bell Hotel – hotel and adjoining pub on the corner of the High Street and Winchcombe Street. Demolished in early 1900s
  • Blenheim Terrace – terrace of four houses at the north end of Portland Street, set back from the road on the western side. Its site is now part of Portland Street car park
  • Boodle’s Court – cluster of low quality houses off the western side of Rutland Street (now part of Brunswick Street), probably lost in slum clearance
  • Brampton Terrace – eleven houses now incorporated into Naunton Terrace
  • Brighton Gardens – market gardens on which Merriville Road is built
  • Bubb’s Court – courtyard off Sherborne Street in Fairview
  • Bubb’s Passage or Cottages – courtyard of four cottages off Swindon Place, behind the High Street. Demolished in 1930s slum clearance
  • Burton Street Brewery – a brewery. In Burton Street. It existed by 1830 but was forced to close in 1922.
  • Byrche’s Farm – also known as Arkell’s Farm, it once occupied land on which Clarence Square is built. The farmhouse itself was on the site of Camden Villa in Clarence Road, and was demolished in the early 1820s. Most famous as a temporary residence of the legendary actress Sarah Siddons.
  • Cambray Meadow – field name for the area which is now the western part of Sandford Park, adjoining Bath Road
  • Cambray Mill – alternative name for Barrett’s Mill
  • Cambray Parade – an aborted grand plan for a vast crescent off Bath Road (opposite the Playhouse) ‘on a magnificent scale comprising upwards of 200 houses of the first magnitude’. It never happened.
  • Camden Terrace – houses in a lane between North Place and Portland Street. Demolished.
  • Carlton Brewery – Carlton Street brewery with associated cottages and a dual-purpose pub and coal merchant. The brewery building is long gone but one or two of its cottages appear to have survived
  • Cheltenham Mill – alternative name for Barrett’s Mill
  • Cheltenham Original Brewery – see Gardner’s Brewery
  • Christ Church Farm – once occupied the fields behind Christ Church Road, where Eldorado Road and Crescent are now
  • Christ Church Terrace – terrace of houses at the north end of Malvern Road
  • Church Meadow – the old field south of the parish church where Royal Crescent now stands
  • Cleveland Parade – houses in Evesham Road
  • Columbia Place – terrace of six houses in Winchcombe Street built c.1824 – still exists but now numbered as part of Winchcombe Street
  • Constitution Place – row of houses in the Promenade, demolished in the 1830s and replaced by the current nos.99-119
  • Conygree Cottages – two houses off Winchcombe Street, lost in slum clearance, originally an old field name
  • Cowell Lane – a lane running south-west from Cudnall Street in Charlton Kings, referred to as far back as 1597, but no trace of it now remains
  • Cross Keys Passage – off the High Street, opposite Grove Street. Named after the now vanished Cross Keys inn.
  • Crown Inn Passage – a passage linking the High Street and Albion Street, alongside the yard of the important Crown Inn (where Top Man is now). When the Crown was demolished in the 1970s it ceased to be a through route, though part of the old yard survives
  • Cypher’s Nursery – Queen’s Road. For 100 years a huge plant nursery, closed 1966 and its gardens now built over. Its ornate gates survive, now located at the High Street end of the Winston Churchill Memorial Garden
  • Cyprus Cottages – short row of redbrick cottages in Alstone Lane, probably built in or just after 1878.
  • Darke’s Farm – in Noverton Lane, Prestbury
  • Dodd’s Cottages – houses in North Place, swept away in the 1960s demolition frenzy and the site now part of the car park
  • Dunally House – also variously known as Woodbine Cottage and North Lodge. 18th century house still extant in St Paul’s Road, hemmed in by later housing. One time home of Lord Dunally, hence the name.
  • East Hayes – later Joseph Pitt House, now Lansdown House
  • Eight Bells Road – thought to be the old name of the little section of street behind the canopied shop at the corner of Clarence Street and the High Street. Named after an old pub called the Eight Bells which still exists but now seems to get a trendy new name every few years.
  • Ellenborough Place – houses in West Drive, shown as a plan on the 1834 map but never built
  • Essex Villas – in Pittville Lawn, north end
  • Fauconberg Terrace – 1860s terrace in Bayshill Road by Samuel Onley, demolished by the Ladies College in 1936
  • Fauconberg Villas – series of detached villas by Samuel Onley in Bayshill Road (one demolished in 1968, the rest survive)
  • Field Lodge – also called Chalybeate Spa Villa (see Spa Town article above). Mutilated stump of this once beautiful house still survives at north end of College Road
  • Fisher’s Court – about 7 cottages off North Street
  • Fountain Passage – early name for Phoenix Passage, off High Street, named after the Fountain Inn (long gone)
  • Galipot Farm – 18th century or earlier farm on the site of Suffolk Square. The farmhouse was replaced by Suffolk House in 1808, itself now replaced by 1930s flats
  • Gallows Oak – oak tree with self-explanatory usage, stood until early 1800s (shown on 1806 map but gone by 1820) at the crossroads between London Road, Hales Road and Old Bath Road. There was also a turnpike house at the junction called Gallows Oak Turnpike
  • Gardner’s Brewery – Henrietta Street, also known as Cheltenham Original Brewery. In use by Whitbread’s until recent years, facade survives as part of The Brewery shopping development
  • Gas Green – also called Gaslight Green, this was the field behind the gasworks, now part of Tesco’s car park
  • Gosditch – old field name for the area on which the St Paul’s streets are built, including St Paul’s church
  • Halfpenny Croft – old name for a meadow beside the River Chelt on which the Neptune Fountain now stands
  • Hanover Parade – row of 12 houses at the north end of Hanover Street, now numbered as part of the street
  • Hamilton Place – terrace of houses on St Paul’s Road to immediate west of the church. Old cast iron nameplate still survives with this name. Some older maps show this as an earlier name for St Paul’s Road itself.
  • Hooper’s Passage – off the High Street just west of Henrietta Street, later known as Tinkler’s Passage from its proximity to the ancient and much lamented Tinkler’s basket shop. All swept away, its site is now the entrance to a car park.
  • Horne Field – green area in the centre of Suffolk Square
  • Hygeia House – original name for Vittoria House (still extant) in Vittoria Walk
  • Imperial Hotel – house in the Promenade, built as a private home, later the Post Office, now Ottaker’s bookshop
  • Imperial Nursery – on the site of Imperial Gardens
  • Jersey Place – houses in Hewlett Road, near junction with All Saints Road
  • Jessop’s Nursery – once a huge and celebrated nursery and pleasure garden between St James’s Square and the River Chelt. Name survives in Jessop Avenue on part of its site.
  • Jubilee Cottages – in Waterloo Street, presumably named for Queen Victoria’s silver or golden jubilee
  • Keynsham Parade – houses on London Road between Keynsham Road and Old Bath Road
  • Keynsham Place – villas on London Road to the east of Corpus Street
  • Kingscote Cottage and Villa – in Grosvenor Place on 1851 census
  • Knapp Place – houses near the junction of New Street and Park Street
  • Latheram Meadows – name of the fields in between St George’s Place and St James’s Square, before they were built on
  • Lemmington Place – houses in Prestbury Road opposite Albert Place
  • Limekiln Row or Place – row of houses in St Paul’s Street North, lost in 1930s slum clearance
  • Liverpool Place – passage off the north side of the High Street alongside former Woolworths
  • Lower Alstone Mill – bottom of Arle Avenue. Most of its buildings survived until the flood defence works were done in 2006
  • Marle Hill Lake – the artificial lake now known as Lower Pittville Lake (in Pittville Park)
  • Marsh, The – area of land on which much of St Paul’s area is built, some of which survives as the western side of Pittville Park
  • Marybone Park – old name for the land on which part of Tivoli is built
  • Maud’s Elm – an ancient elm tree, subject to many local legends, on the site of the mini-roundabout in Swindon Road. Felled c.1906, the name survives in an adjacent property. It was originally called Maule’s Elm, which rather screws up the legends about Maud.
  • Maule’s Cottages – St Paul’s Road on site now occupied by Vine Court
  • Mawe & Tatlow’s Museum – curiously shaped but short-lived establishment on the site of Barclay’s bank next to the Rotunda, displaying and selling mineral specimens. Demolished c.1843
  • Mitre Fields – area on which Mitre Street (and the Mitre Inn) was built, though it’s uncertain which was named first
  • Montague Place – houses in London Road near corner of Priory Place
  • Montpellier Baths – one time public baths in (appropriately) Bath Road, built c.1804 and also variously used as a salts manufactory and hydropathic centre. Now the Playhouse Theatre (the auditorium sits over the old swimming pool, which is still beautifully preserved underneath)
  • Montpellier Brewery – on approximate site of Victoria Retreat
  • Montpellier Buildings – original name for the terrace in Montpellier Spa Road
  • Montpellier Place – pair of houses in the Bath Road, destroyed in the 1960s as part of the Eagle Star tower block development
  • Nelson Place – houses in Evesham Road
  • Newman’s Place – an early courtyard off Devonshire Street, built before 1820 and scheduled for clearance in 1879
  • Nightingale Cottages – in Waterloo Street
  • Normal School – once stood in St Paul’s Road next to what is now Francis Close Hall, formerly the Normal College
  • Northwick Place – a terrace along Bath Road in Leckhampton, approximately on the site now occupied by Sainsbury’s. Demolished in the 1960s
  • Nutt’s Passage – off the north side of Fairview Road (or Mount Pleasant as it was formerly called)
  • Old Farm – 18th century or earlier large farmouse in St George’s Place, home of Captain Skillicorne, demolished 1858 for building of Shaftsbury Hall
  • Old Park – old name for the area on which Suffolk Road and St James’s Square were built
  • Orchard Terrace – nos. 28-46 Libertus Road
  • Osborne Terrace – row of 10 houses in Market Street
  • Oxford Buildings – still existing terrace of four on London Road next to Hewlett Road traffic lights, name still just visible in the stonework
  • Oxford Parade – still exists: row of terraced houses set back from London Road behind large communal gardens
  • Oxford Place – 81-107 London Road
  • Oxford Villas – three houses on London Road, on the corner of Corpus Street
  • Page’s Row – two of these have existed, neither of which survive. One was down a passage off York Street in Fairview, built early 1800s and criticised for its insanitary conditions as early as 1849. The other was a short terrace in Alstone
  • Parker’s Court – courtyard down Rose & Crown Passage
  • Phoenix Passage – tiny passage leading off the High Street to Swindon Place, mostly demolished but a few cottages still survive, just to the east of present day Poole Way. Named after the Phoenix Inn, which may or may not be the same as the Fountain Inn (it had an earlier name of Fountain Passage)
  • Pittville Parade – houses in Evesham Road
  • Pittville Place – houses in Prestbury Road on corner of Pittville Crescent
  • Pittville Villas – houses in Prestbury Road backing onto Pittville Crescent Lane
  • Plough Garden – once a large market garden to the immediate west of Folly Lane
  • Plough Hotel – once Cheltenham’s main coaching inn and the focal point of the High Street, with a huge yard and stabling area at the back. Demolished early 1980s to make way for Regent Arcade, but a replica of its facade was built as the arcade’s entrance.
  • Portland Terrace – houses in Prestbury Road on the corner of Portland Square
  • Priory Buildings – terrace in London Road next to the Hewlett Road junction
  • Priory Parade – terrace set back from London Road, next to Oxford Parade
  • Pritchard’s Passage – off the lower High Street roughly opposite Grove Street, notorious for disorderly behaviour in 1830s
  • Promenade Terrace – houses in Promenade opposite Imperial Gardens
  • Queen’s Buildings – houses down Wellington Passage, which runs between the High Street and Albion Street. Named after Queen Charlotte who was patroness of a Female Orphan Asylum there in 1806
  • Queen’s Place – terrace on Tewkesbury Road roughly opposite Queen Street, demolished
  • Rehoboth Place – row of about 3 houses in Swindon Road near Worcester Street
  • Roper’s Row – formerly a row of houses off New Street
  • Rope Walk – vanished passageway off Swindon Road on site now occupied by car park behind Henrietta Street
  • Roseland Terrace – row of houses in Rowanfield Road
  • Rosina Garden – nursery garden of early 19th century, near London Road/Hales Road junction
  • Royal Hotel – this once grand hotel in the High Street was demolished and its site is now the Beechwood Arcade
  • Sandford Fields – land in between Thirlestaine Road and the River Chelt, some of which survives as Sandford Park
  • Sandy Lane – very old name for an ancient road that once passed through the north part of town but is now mostly consumed by alternative street arrangements. Also known as Sandshards and the Old Sandy Lane
  • Seagrave House – former name for large old house in Lower High Street more recently called Normandy House
  • Sherborne Brewery – Winchcombe Street, behind Odeon cinema site
  • Sherborne Terrace – houses in Fairview Road
  • Sion Row – very old cottages behind the south-east side of St Mary’s churchyard, obliterated by redevelopment
  • Six Chimnies Farm – old farm in Arle Avenue, of which the farmhouse was once an ancient manor house. Demolished 1930s for housing development
  • Somers Place – houses in Tewkesbury Road, opposite Tesco’s. Demolished, probably for road widening.
  • Somers Town – projected name for the series of artisan streets off Tewkesbury Road (locally known as Lower Dockem). Appears on 1834 map but otherwise name seems to have died out.
  • Southampton Place – houses opposite Belle Vue Hotel in the High Street
  • Spread Eagle Terrace – row of six houses behind the High Street backing onto what is now the Winston Churchill Memorial Gardens, and named after the nearby Spread Eagle pub. Demolished some time in the 20th century
  • Springwell Place – houses in Sandford Street
  • Stamford Terrace – houses at south end of Regent Street (still extant but name is lost)
  • St Ann’s Cottage – large house once alone in its own grounds, now incorporated into St Ann’s Road. House now divided into two and both halves renamed.
  • St Margaret’s Terrace – 1820s terrace built by lady builder Katherine Monson in St Margaret’s Road on corner of North Place, still extant
  • St Peter’s Place – row of houses between Tewkesbury Road and Swindon Road, near Stanhope Street (Hope Street). Demolished in 1920s slum clearance
  • Sudeley Place – terrace of 8 houses in Winchcombe Street, now demolished
  • Suffolk Mews – in Andover Street
  • Suffolk Place – behind Montpellier roundabout
  • Sun Hotel – once in Regent Street roughly on the site of the County Court building
  • Swindon Passage – once led to the notorious slums of Swindon Place, behind the High Street. Site now occupied by Post Office in Poole Way
  • Tavistock Place – houses in Rodney Road
  • Taylor’s Passage – houses behind the High Street to the east of Grove Street
  • Togwell’s Paysage – passage on the north side of the High Street opposite Park Street, now on site of Poole Way and probably swept away in slum clearance
  • Upper Alstone Mill – formerly stood on the River Chelt at the bottom of Millbrook Street. Site now occupied by the Millennium Bridge
  • Vauxhall Place – down an alley behind Tewkesbury Road between Elm Street and Malvern Street, named after nearby pub. Demolished
  • Veterinary College – this establishment run by John Shaw M.R.C.V.S. was listed in Albion Street in the 1851 census
  • Walkhamstead Field – large field in Leckhampton on which Shurdington Road was built
  • Warwick Buildings – courtyard of 13 houses off Winchcombe Street opposite Warwick Place, razed in 1930s slum clearance
  • Wellington Obelisk – once stood by the River Chelt in the garden of Wellington Mansion (see below). It outlived the house itself but was demolished in 1862
  • White Cross Corner – old name for the junction of Leckhampton Lane, Farm Lane, Crippetts Road and Church Lane
  • Wight’s Theological Library – once occupied the building in the Promenade now home to Jones’ shoe shop
  • Woodbine Cottage – original name for North Lodge – see Dunally House
  • Woodland Cottage – late 18th/early 19th century house in Rodney Road, once on the bank of the Chelt (before it was culverted), now occupied by Horsleys
  • Wood’s Passage – houses off Sherborne Street, demolished in 1936 slum clearance
  • Worcester Villas – houses in Albert Road
  • Yatman’s Yard – off the High Street, probably on the site of Grosvenor Street
  • York Passage – passageway off the High Street which once ran alongside the York Hotel (long demolished) and led to Grosvenor Terrace. It still exists in part, but the name has been dropped
  • York Place – terrace in Bath Road
  • York Terrace – terrace in St George’s Road opposite magistrate’s court

DEMOLISHED HOUSES

  • Abbeyholme – built by the architect John Middleton as his own home in 1866, originally called Westholme and filled with Pre-Raphaelite craftsmanship. Stood in Overton Road, demolished 1973 for a ghastly block of low-rise flats
  • Alstone Lawn – large elegant house in landscaped gardens on the corner of Gloucester Road and Alstone Lane, demolished 1933 and its grounds consumed by the Pates Avenue council estate
  • Arle House – built 1826 in Village Road, originally part of a large estate including two farms, demolished 1960 and replaced by dull modern housing
  • Bays Hill Lodge – sometimes called Bayshill House or Fauconberg Lodge, built in 1780 and once stood alone on the crest of the hill in what is now Overton Road. Used as lodgings for King George III in 1788, demolished around 1856
  • Belmont Cottage – on the site of Belmont Road, now replaced by flats
  • Blenheim Villa – also on the site of Belmont Road, replaced by flats
  • Brookbank Cottage – stood beside the River Chelt alongside what is now Honeybourne Way, demolished 1980s
  • Cambray House – see Wellington Mansion
  • Cambray Villa – later known as Cambray Pavilion, built very early 1800s on Bath Road, on the site of the Moon Under Water pub. Demolished 1929
  • Casino – or Casino House, later renamed Halden House. Large house at the south end of Painswick Road, built 1820s and used for most of its life as a private academy, demolished 1930s
  • Cheltondale – designed by John Middleton and built 1868, occupied the corner of College Road and Orrisdale Terrace on site of present hospital A&E department, demolished c.1982
  • Clare Villa – later called Karenza, now the site of Cheltenham College Junior School
  • Clonbrock House – once a posh lodging house for illustrious visitors to the town, this house pre-dated the Regency period and stood in St Margaret’s Road until demolished in the 1960s. Its site was the barrel yard of the brewery for many years, now subsumed by the Brewery redevelopment
  • Cranley Lodge – once stood in Wellington Square and was the home of a local WW1 poet, Cyril Winterbotham. Built 1820s, demolished 1986 for a block of flats
  • Elms, The – large house in Swindon Road, served as a boys’ orphanage in later years, demolished 1979 and now the site of Pope’s Close
  • Fairfield House – Victorian house in Naunton Lane, towards the Leckhampton end. It was demolished to make way for Fairfield Park Road around 1904
  • Georgiana Cottage – later Georgiana House, north end of Bath Road, a favourite haunt of Lord Byron
  • Gothic Cottage (1) – on site of Montpellier Arcade
  • Gothic Cottage (2) – attractive house of c.1820 which once stood in Portland Street on part of the current car park site, demolished late 1960s
  • Great House, The – built 1760 on the site where St Matthew’s church now stands in Clarence Street, once the centre of Cheltenham’s social life, demolished 1859
  • Grosvenor House – off Albion Street at back of Beechwood Arcade
  • Grotto, The – popular tea-drinking establishment in Mill Street, Prestbury during the Regency era but demolished before end of 19th century
  • Grove Cottage – once stood on site of Montpellier Street
  • Hamilton Cottage – built early 1800s in St Paul’s Road on corner of what is now Brunswick Street, originally isolated and rural, demolished c.1880s to make way for The Engineers pub, now itself demolished and replaced by hideously ugly flats
  • Harley Lodge – later called Crossways, once sat in the middle of the A40 on Tivoli Circus, demolished 1955 for road widening
  • Harwood Lodge – in Swindon Road close to Maud’s Elm. Shown on 1871 census
  • Holly Cottage – also called Holly Lodge, a villa on High Street opposite Berkeley Place, demolished to make way for College Road
  • Jersey Villa – Hewlett Road. Marked on 1820 map.
  • Lindley – 1860s villa in College Road, demolished 1980s to make way for a car park at Cheltenham General Hosptial
  • Lindsay Cottage – later named Wolseley House. Old house from about 1805, occupying a site just behind Wolseley Terrace, originally on its own in the fields, but later built up with adjoining streets, demolished 1960s for a vile concrete telephone exchange
  • Loretta – one of the villas demolished in the 1960s to accommodate the hideous Eagle Star tower block
  • Marle Hill House – large house, once the home of Robert Capper, in the western part of Pittville Park. Demolished 1960s and Albemarle Gate now occupies its site.
  • Monson Villa – the first of Katherine Monson’s houses, stood on the junction of Swindon Road and Monson Avenue. Built late 18th century, demolished late 1960s and replaced by the ugly Whitbread office block, now itself replaced by the ultra-hideous NCP car park
  • Montpellier House – one of the Bath Road houses destroyed in the late 1960s for the Eagle Star tower block development. Another Montpellier House still exists near the Montpellier roundabout
  • Nazareth House – on the Bath Road opposite Cheltenham College, demolished 1969 for the much hated Linotype-Hell offices, replaced in the 1990s by the even more hated Century Court flats
  • North Parade House – Winchcombe Street, on the site of the vile Trinity House
  • Phoenix Lodge – another casualty of the Eagle Star tower block
  • Powers Court – early manor house, noted as far back as 1573, its grounds once occupying most of Rodney Road, and probably the home of the wealthy Power family who were resident in Cheltenham since medieval times. Presumably demolished before 1806 when Rodney Lodge (still extant) was built on its site. Another later house called Powers Court House formerly existed nearby at the corner of the High Street.
  • Prestbury Park – see Rosehill. The house is gone but the name has transferred to Cheltenham Racecourse just across the road
  • Priory, The – large house on corner of London Road and Priory Street, demolished 1968 and replaced with a godawful office block, mercifully demolished in 2000 and replaced with a near-replica of the original house
  • Rosehill – a Regency villa designed by Papworth which stood just off New Barn Lane behind Evesham Road. Its layout was tweaked in the 19th century and renamed Prestbury Park before reverting once more to its original name. Pointlessly demolished in 1993 for the development of the Gulf Oil offices, for which I hope they’re thoroughly ashamed of themselves
  • Rutland House – built around 1804 in Swindon Road opposite present Matalan site, originally a fine house in a rural setting, fell on hard times as the area became less salubrious. Had one end knocked off c.1830s when St George’s Street was formed, stood derelict for many years before demolition c.2004
  • Sandford Lodge – apparently (1841 census) a detached house at the bottom of Corpus Street
  • Segrave Villas – stood in Park Place, site now occupied by Mercian Court
  • Selkirk Villa – very fine house on Pittville Circus (which it pre-dated) with curious rounded turret, built c.1817, demolished 1970s, though its blander replacement still bears the name
  • St Margaret’s Villa – grand house in St Margaret’s Road, built by Katherine Monson in 1805 and serving as the Black & White coach station for many years. Destroyed during a WW2 bombing raid in December 1940
  • Suffolk House – built in 1808 for the Earl of Suffolk on the site of Galipot Farm, in the corner of what later became Suffolk Square. Demolished 1935 for a block of flats.
  • Sydney House – a large brick-built house in Albion Street in the early 19th century, long gone
  • Teatray Cottage – this gloriously named house was in the fields between Gardners Lane and Folly Lane
  • Tudor Lodge – on The Park, a Tudor Gothic house of 1837 built by architect Samuel Whitfield Daukes as his own home, demolished 1966 for a row of tediously bland houses
  • Virginia Water – house in The Park with large ornamental lake. The lake survives, but the house is now the site of Park House flats
  • Wellington Mansion – originally called Cambray House, though there was also another nearby house of that name, so it’s a bit confusing. Built in 1807 on land between Bath Road and Wellington Street, the River Chelt was re-routed to flow through its large gardens. Its became Wellington Mansion because it was leased several times to the Duke of Wellington. Demolished 1843.
  • Westall – large old farmhouse formerly at Westal Green on the junction of Lansdown Road and Queen’s Road, demolished 1840s

VANISHED PUBS
(for breweries and hotels, see Obsolete Names list above)

  • Albert Arms – beerhouse on the corner of Albert Street and St Paul’s Road, closed 1968. Survives as private house
  • Albion Inn – double-fronted pub in Gloucester Road, closed in 1967 but building survives as Albion House
  • Albion Vaults – corner of Sherborne Street, building survives
  • Anchor Vaults – once a pub attached to the important Anchor Brewery on the corner of Warwick Place and Winchcombe Street, the pub building survives but the brewery itself was unfortunately demolished and replaced by ugly flats at the end of 2008
  • Apple Tree Inn – a relatively short-lived pub in Russell Street, St Peter’s. Building may well survive as private housing
  • Baker’s Arms – one of the few buildings in Cheltenham to succumb to WW2 bombing. It was a Victorian pub in the Lower High Street close to the railway bridge. A bomb landed in its garden from an air raid on 11th December 1940 and partially destroyed the building (its occupants had a lucky escape). It was demolished in 1941
  • Barley Mow – one of many corner beerhouses along Tewkesbury Road, on the corner of Stanhope Street (now Hope Street). Demolished in 1963 for road widening
  • Bath House – final name for the Welsh Harp pub in New Street before it was closed and converted to residential flats (losing its stained glass windows in the process)
  • Battledown Inn – once stood on the corner of Hales Road and Hewlett Road. Demolished
  • Beaufort Hunt – not to be confused with the Beaufort Arms, this beerhouse was in Fairview on the corner of Union Street and Trinity School Lane. It was closed and demolished in 1927
  • Beehive Inn – not to be confused with the two present Beehive Inns in Bouncers Lane and Montpellier respectively, a beerhouse of this name once traded in London Road in Charlton Kings. Its building survives as Balcarras Farm
  • Bengal Arms – one of the many rough beerhouses in Stanhope Street (now Hope Street) which was completely rebuilt in a slum clearance programme, so no trace of it survives
  • Berkeley Arms – one of Cheltenham’s early pubs, existing by 1830. It was in Albion Street, approximately where the back of Debenhams is now. Sadly it was demolished as part of the Beechwood shopping centre development
  • Black Horse – a small beerhouse once occupying 24 Rosehill Street. Now a residential house but the iron bracket on the wall survives, minus its sign
  • Blue Boys – a possibly short-lived beerhouse in Albert Place, opened around 1836
  • Boar’s Head – beerhouse in Henrietta Street. The building survives as a residential house and still has a blank plaster panel where its name was once displayed
  • Brave Old Oak – one of many pubs along Tewkesbury Road, perhaps demolished as long ago as the early 1900s
  • Brewer’s Arms – two pubs once bore this name. One was a beerhouse in St Paul’s Street North, probably still surviving as a private dwelling. The other was on Tewkesbury Road on the corner of Waterloo Street. It closed in 1930 and was demolished soon after
  • Bricklayer’s Arms – pub in a small street off Gloucester Road called Alstone Terrace, now vanished and its site occupied by Tesco’s car park
  • Brighton Arms – vanished pub in Bath Road, on Lloyds Bank site
  • Britannia Inn – existed by 1830 on the corner of Fairview Road and Sherborne Street, and survived until the 1980s when it was demolished for road widening. Another Britannia Inn once stood on the corner of Swindon Road and St Paul’s Street South, selling groceries as well as beer. It closed in 1927 and was demolished
  • British Crown Tavern – still surviving in residential use, this tavern was in the corner building of Dunalley Street and St Paul’s Road. It closed in the 1970s
  • Brunswick Arms – a beerhouse in Brunswick Street which survived the street being bombed in WW2 and finally closed in 1962. Now a private house
  • Burton Brewery Inn – a nice Regency building in St James’ Square, still extant but changing its name and usage many times
  • Calcutta Inn – an iconic Cheltenham pub with a lovely curved frontage which stood on the corner of Gloucester Road and St George’s Road. It was demolished in 2003 and replaced by a truly hideous and oversized block of flats
  • Caledonian Inn – on the corner of King Street, opposite the University of Gloucestershire campus, is the surviving building of this former pub which has been derelict for as long as I can remember, probably since it closed in the early 1980s. It originally brewed its own beer on site and is a lovely building.
  • Carpenter’s Arms – no.39 Portland Square was formerly a corner pub, closed and converted to a private house around 1941
  • Central Inn – a former beerhouse on the west side of Bennington Street, presumably named after the Centre Stone which once stood in an arch over the entrance to Bennington Street to mark the centre of town and has now been moved to the building on the corner. I’m not sure whether the pub building still exists.
  • Cleveland Arms or Inn –one of the many Tewkesbury Road corner pubs, this one on the corner of Cleveland Street. Closed around 1928 and since demolished
  • Coach and Horses – a small alehouse in Portland Terrace, which is the old name for a row of houses in Portland Square. Although long closed, the building is now no.4 Portland Square and still has its interesting frontage
  • Commercial Arms – corner pub on the junction of Gratton Terrace and Commercial Street. It brewed its own beer on site but closed in the 1920s
  • Compasses Inn – on the corner of Park Street and New Street. Renamed the Cavern in recent years but seems to be derelict now
  • Cooperage Inn – no.371 High Street, closed as far back as 1907. Premises survive as a shop
  • Cooper’s Arms – once stood in the High Street on the corner of St James’ Street, but was burned down in March 1909. It was rebuilt with a distinctive façade of green and red tiles and still serves as a pub, having gone through a few changes of name
  • Crispin Inn – a relatively short-lived pub in New Street which closed in the 1920s
  • Cross Keys – High Street pub which once stood opposite Grove Street. Another Cross Keys existed not far away in Tewkesbury Road, surviving until 1969 but now demolished
  • Crown and Cushion – large pub at the north end of Bath Road, still trading sporadically under different names
  • Crown Inn – one of the town’s oldest and most important High Street coaching inns, in existence by 1611 and geared up for stabling up to 100 horses in its heyday. It survived in reduced form until the 1970s, but sadly the lovely building has been lost. It stood on the site now occupied by Top Man. A smaller pub also called the Crown Inn was located in Upper Park Street for a century or so, still extant but now a private club
  • Dawn Run – one of several names for the Bath Hotel in Albion Street, named after the famous racehorse who won the 1984 Cheltenham Gold Cup
  • Devonshire Inn – once stood on the corner of the High Street and Devonshire Street. The building still survives as business premises. It originally brewed its own beer and closed in 1927
  • Dewdrop Inn – this gloriously named pub once traded in Townsend Street
  • Dove and Rainbow – listed in 1891 census at 37 Burton Street, now no.34. Next door to the bigger pub originally called the Welsh Harp, later the Bath House. Still survives as a private house
  • Duke of Brunswick – large corner pub at the junction of Brunswick Street and St Paul’s Road. The premises are still extant, if somewhat altered and a little shabby, but the pub closed decades ago
  • Duke of Sussex – on the corner of Swindon Road and St Paul’s Street South. The building survives as residential flats, the pub having closed in 2002 after multiple (and sometimes naff) name changes
  • Duke of York – traded for a few years in the late 19th century in Oxford Passage, between St Margaret’s Road and the High Street. Probably still survives as the area hasn’t changed too much
  • Duke’s Head – small beerhouse in Duke Street, built by the 1840s and now a residential house
  • Early Dawn – beerhouse in the High Street on the corner of Park Street. Closed 1927, but building survives. It made the national news in 1871 when the landlord’s daughter, Emily Gardner, was murdered in Pittville
  • Eight Bells Inn – the pub is still going, but now named the 2Pigs. It’s one of Cheltenham’s longest surviving pubs and is situated down Church Street beside the Minster church
  • Elephant and Castle – one of the town’s more colourfully named pubs along Tewkesbury Road near Stanhope Street (Hope Street), shown on the 1834 map and closing some time between WW2 and the early 1960s, when this whole street was razed for road widening
  • Endeavour Inn – 19th century beerhouse in North Place, almost certainly demolished as little now survives of the original streetscape. The name was also used for a small and possibly short-lived beerhouse in Jersey Street
  • Engineer’s Arms – late 19th century pub and one-time brewery on the south side of St Paul’s Road, with an unusual frontage. Survived as the New Engineers until 2002, but was demolished in 2004 and replaced with a block of godawful flats
  • Fairview Inn – a large 19th century pub in Fairview Road on the site now occupied by Fairview Close. It closed in 1979 and was demolished shortly after
  • Farmer’s Arms – once stood in Worcester Street off Tewkesbury Road, but the area succumbed to slum clearance and was totally redeveloped around the 1920s
  • Folly Inn – a beerhouse in Folly Lane, lost to slum clearance
  • Forester’s Arms – a beerhouse in Grosvenor Street whose building survives, appropriately, as Pops Homebrew
  • Fountain Inn – a pub of this name was listed in 1841 on the High Street. Site now occupied by Poole Way. Another Fountain Inn could be found on the Bath Road in Leckhampton, where Sainsbury’s is now. It closed in 1929 and was in use as a shop until the early 1960s, when it was demolished
  • Full Moon – the name first belonged to an Albion Street beerhouse which burned down in June 1853. Around the same time a pub of the same name opened at what is now 295 High Street, and closed in the 1980s. Its building survives as business premises
  • Garrick’s Head – pub at 16 Bath Street named after the 18th century actor David Garrick. Cheltenham’s original theatre once stood near here. Pub closed in 1998 but now trading as a music venue, Slak.
  • George Inn – the original George Inn was an important and superior inn in the High Street, in existence by 1674 but disappears from records after the 1850s. The name later applied to a corner pub on the junction of the High Street and Milsom Street, which closed some years ago and is now occupied by Cheltenham Labour Club
  • Gladstone Arms – a corner pub at 53 Sherborne Street which closed in 1968. The building is now residential
  • Globe Inn – this pub was in North Street, and was closed and demolished in 1969
  • Gloucester House Inn – the sad shell of this once lovely Regency building on the corner of Gloucester Place and the inner ring road stood derelict and propped up with scaffolding for many years, and was only recently demolished (way beyond repair)
  • Golden Cross – a corner pub on the junction of Tewkesbury Road and Townsend Street, lost in a road widening scheme in 1972
  • Golden Heart – once stood in that part of the High Street which was cleared in the 1930s and now occupied by Poole Way. It traded during the second half of the 19th century
  • Golden Lion – next door to the Bingo hall in the High Street, the building survives as a takeaway but the pub closed as long ago as 1872. Also known as the Roebuck
  • Great Western – large corner pub on the junction of Crescent Place and Clarence Street. Trading under a plethora of name changes ever since
  • Green Dragon – listed in the 1851 census as an inn next door to a wood yard in Albion Street. Still there in 1872 but further info is scarce
  • Greyhound Inn – an old inn in North Street, at what is now Boots Corner. This stretch of road was originally called Greyhound Lane. It seems to have closed and vanished in the late 19th century, and the street name vanished with it. There was another more recent Greyhound Inn at the north end of Hewlett Road which was demolished without planning consent in 2008
  • Grosvenor Brewery Inn – beer was brewed in a yard behind Albion Street in the 19th century and sold at this inn on the junction with Sherborne Place. The lovely building survives but ceased to be a pub in 1968
  • Hanover Inn – although this small pub in Hanover Street closed in 1977 and became a private house you won’t have any trouble spotting where it was: the name is still there in unmissable plastic lettering on the end gable
  • Harp Inn – once a small High Street pub on the corner of Grove Street, on the opposite corner to the much larger Shakespeare Inn. It was demolished many years ago and its site is a scruffy vacant plot
  • Hereford Arms – used to trade in Winchcombe Street opposite the site of the Odeon cinema, currently in use as a restaurant
  • Hole in the Wall – a beerhouse in Chapel Street
  • Horse and Groom – Victorian pub on the corner of St George’s Place and Chester Walk. It closed around 1970 but its name is still carved in stone above the door
  • King William Vaults – traded on the corner of Bath Road and Kew Place until 1943. Building survives
  • King’s Arms – as well as the King’s Arms which still trades in Gloucester Road, there was a small mid-terrace pub with the same name in the Bath Road in Leckhampton. The building is now a shop
  • King’s Head – once a High Street pub and hotel in a lovely imposing building. Demolished in the 1980s and replaced by bland shops
  • Knapp Inn – a late Victorian beerhouse in New Street
  • Lamb and Flag – a long-gone pub on the corner of Union Street and Commercial Street
  • Lansdown Inn – a sad loss to the town, this lovely Regency inn on Gloucester Road was demolished in the 1980s to make way for TGI Fridays
  • Laughing Cat – an early pub in Sherborne Street which doesn’t seem to have existed beyond the 1850s
  • Leckhampton Inn – a thriving pub in Shurdington Road until 2001. Sadly demolished and replaced with flats
  • Little Crown – corner pub on the junction of Commercial Street and Bethesda Street, closed in 1980. The premises are now occupied by Macdonald’s vet’s surgery
  • Little Owl – one of several Cheltenham pubs named after racehorses, this Victorian pub in Cirencester Road started out as the New Inn and was renamed when Little Owl won the Gold Cup in 1981. It closed and reopened several times in the early years of the millennium but was sold to a developer and demolished in 2015 – another great loss to the town and a triumph of greed over common sense
  • Malvern Inn – 164 Leckhampton Road. Closed in 1997 and now a private dwelling
  • Marlborough Arms – once a corner pub on the junction of Duke Street and Princes Street. Now residential
  • Masonic Arms – small beerhouse in Albion Street, presumably near the Masonic Hall. It seems to have closed in the early 1900s
  • Midland Inn – Gloucester Road, and not to be confused with the Midland Hotel which still trades in the same road. This one was a few doors further up from the mini roundabout in a Regency building which originally had a Doric portico. After the pub closed in the 1970s the portico was lost but the building survived as business premises until 2004 when it was demolished for a cram-’em-in flats development
  • Mitre Inn – large corner pub where Sandford Street meets Mitre Street, perhaps named after the Mitre Fields on which it was built. It closed in 2003 and the lovely building was converted to flats
  • Mount Pleasant Inn – until the 1920s, this pub was somewhere along Fairview Road, which was formerly called Mount Pleasant in the section east of Winchcombe Street
  • Nag’s Head – used to trade on the north side of the High Street on the corner of Granville Street. The striking yellow-brick building is still there, though the pub closed in the 1970s. It may have had an earlier building as it’s shown on the 1834 map with a large yard behind it (the present building doesn’t look that old)
  • Nelson Inn – a later incarnation of the Phoenix Inn which stood on the High Street next to Phoenix Passage. It was demolished as part of the development of Poole Way. In 1912 it made the papers when the landlord shot himself after trying (unsuccessfully) to murder his wife
  • New Inn – several Cheltenham pubs have had this name over the years. A venerable old pub in Hewlett Road on the corner of Duke Street was called this until it was rebranded the Pump and Optic and later the Fiery Angel. Last time I went past it was closed down. Another important New Inn was in Gloucester Road, renamed the New Penny in 1970 and demolished in 2008 to make way for some tasteless plastic-clad flats. A third New Inn could be found in Cirencester Road until renamed the Little Owl (also shamefully demolished). At one time there may have been a New Inn in Prestbury Road, but not in living memory.
  • Noah’s Ark – once stood in St George’s Street
  • Old Anchor – among the plethora of pubs in Tewkesbury Road was this small Victorian beerhouse, located between Sun Street and Queen Street. It was razed along with the rest of the streetscape in the early 1960s when the road became a dual carriageway
  • Old Cherry Tree –an old pub in Swindon Road which was unfortunate enough to be in the way of the Honeybourne railway line when it was built in 1906
  • Oxford Arms – a beerhouse in Corpus Street, near the fancy Oxford Parade buildings. It was lost to redevelopment many years ago
  • Pack Horse – listed on the 1891 census at 63 Burton Street. The building survives in residential use and still has the old archway which once led to its back yard
  • Parrot Inn – High Street beerhouse which stood on the site of Poole Way in the Victorian era. There is now another Parrot in North Place
  • Pelican Inn – early inn thought to have existed by 1690 on the south side of the High Street. Still there in the mid 18th century but info is scarce
  • Peter’s Bar – this Montpellier pub in Montpellier Walk was immortalised in the television series Butterflies. It closed in 1997 and reopened as O’Neill’s at a time when Irish pubs were all the rage
  • Phoenix Inn – a pub of this name stood in the High Street from the 1850s onwards. It may have been the same as the earlier Fountain Inn and it was later named the Nelson Inn. Lost to slum clearance in the 1930s, now site of Poole Way. Another Phoenix Inn was situated in Andover Road on the corner of Tivoli Place. It’s still trading but now called the Tivoli
  • Pilgrim Inn – a long lost beerhouse in Rutland Street, once a notorious slum area which is now part of Brunswick Street. Some of the original housing survives but I’m not sure where the pub was
  • Plasterer’s Arms – also in Rutland Street: same applies
  • Portland Inn – a brewery and inn in Albert Place, later part of Sherborne Street. It closed some time in the early 20th century and the house burned down in 1955
  • Prince of Wales – although there is still a pub with that name in Portland Street, the 1851 census suggests there was also a beerhouse in Albion Street with the same name
  • Prince’s Plume – terrace beerhouse on the west side of Princes Street. The building survives as a private residence
  • Queen’s Head – among the many Tewkesbury Road corner pubs was this beerhouse on the corner of Queen Street. Its building, like all the others in Tewkesbury Road, was swept away in the early 1960s to accommodate the dual carriageway. The pub may already have closed before then.
  • Railway Inn – the railway after which this pub in Norwood Street was named was nothing to do with trains but was the much earlier tram railway which transported building stone from the quarries on Leckhampton Hill. Its building still survives in residential use and retains its etched window glass. There is another Railway Inn still trading in Knapp Road, and other pubs of that name have also existed in the town at various times
  • Ram Inn – once existed in Albion Walk, the passageway beside Boots on the High Street, originally known as America Passage. The pub closed in 1896
  • Red Lion – a High Street pub on the south side, just down from the Ambrose Street mini-roundabout. The building survives as the Oriental Food Store
  • Robin Hood Inn – once stood in St James’s Street. The building is now gone
  • Roebuck Inn – earlier name for the High Street pub which became the Golden Lion. Long closed but the building survives
  • Rose and Crown – gave its name to Rose and Crown Passage, which still survives, but the pub itself was demolished after its closure in 1980
  • Royal Foresters Arms – original name for the mid-terrace pub in Townsend Street which later became the Horse and Jockey. It ceased trading in 2009 and is now student digs
  • Royal Oak – still trading in the High Street, but was renamed the Irish Oak in the 1990s when Irish pubs were uber-trendy
  • Sadler’s Arms – corner pub in Larput Place. Building survives as a private house
  • Sandford Inn – small beerhouse in Sandford Street which closed in the 1970s and is now a private house
  • Seven Stars – beerhouse in Henrietta Street. Only the west side of this street survives but it’s very possible the Seven Stars building is still there
  • Shakespeare Inn – still trading in the High Street, but the decision was taken in recent years to drop its very old name and call it the Shamrock.
  • Shamrock Inn – long vanished beerhouse in Grove Street, which was the heart of Cheltenham’s Irish community in the mid 19th century as large numbers of Irish labourers came seeking work on the building sites and railways
  • Sherborne Arms – in Sherborne Street. This terrace pub traded for a long time. It existed by 1830 and only closed in 2011. The building survives – for now.
  • Somerset Arms – there is still a pub of this name in Moorend Street, but at one time there was also one in the High Street, closed in 1923
  • Spread Eagle – at 258 High Street in the 1891 census, which would have been close to what is now the Winston Churchill Memorial Gardens. A row of cottages were named after it and reached via a passageway behind its yard (all gone now). It closed in 1964
  • Stonehouse Inn – stood on the corner of Swindon Road and Henrietta Street until its closure in the early 1980s. Demolished
  • Sun Inn – stood until the early 1980s in the High Street just where the road bends round into Poole Way. A nondescript block of flats occupies its site
  • Swan Inn – built in 1725 on the corner of Winchcombe Street and the High Street, and important enough that part of Winchcombe Street was once named Swan Lane. It seems to have closed in the 1790s. Not to be confused with the Old Swan Inn further down the High Street
  • Swindon Inn – corner pub on the junction of Queen Street and Swindon Road. Its site has been redeveloped as a housing estate
  • Sydney Arms – traded in a Regency building in Pittville Street before the entire streetscape was wiped away in a bonkers 1960s redevelopment frenzy
  • Talbot Inn – mid-terrace pub in Duke Street, now converted to housing. Closed in 1984
  • Ten Bells – small beerhouse in Bath Road in Leckhampton, which closed in 1964. Building still survives as business premises
  • Three Crowns – still trading in Hatherley Road as The Hatherley
  • Three Horseshoes – one of several one time pubs in Henrietta Street. The building may have survived, depending what side of the road it was on
  • Tiger Inn – once stood in Tewkesbury Road. The area is heavily redeveloped and little remains of its original layout
  • Tivoli Inn – not to be confused with the present pub The Tivoli, this one was a few doors down in Tivoli Place and traded from the 1850s to early 1980s. The building survives as business premises
  • Turf Tavern – beerhouse shown as no.100 Albion Street in the 1851 census
  • Turk’s Head – a beerhouse in Fairview Road which has not survived the various destructions of the townscape in that area
  • Unicorn Inn – 19th century mid-terrace beerhouse in Hungerford Street. Building survives as a private house. Another Unicorn Inn existed in Wellington Passage off the High Street, near where the Beechwood Arcade is now
  • Union Inn – a pub in Union Street which survived until about 1960, after which the whole terrace was demolished
  • Vauxhall Brewey Inn – a pub on Tewkesbury Road which brewed its own beer on site. The building was lost along with all the other old buildings along that road. The Vauxhall name survived for a time in a modern pub on Tewkesbury Road, also now closed and demolished
  • Victoria Inn – original name of the corner pub on St Paul’s Road and Hanover Street, currently trading as the St Paul’s Tavern
  • Vine Tree Inn – one of several pubs in Albion Street, forced to close in 1929 and its site is now lost to redevelopment. Another pub of the same name once existed in Mill Street in Prestbury (building survives as a cottage)
  • Welsh Harp – original name for a corner pub on the junction of New Street and Burton Street, which was called the Bath House in its last incarnation before closure in 2007. It’s now converted to flats
  • Wheatsheaf Inn – in addition to the present Wheatsheaf in the Old Bath Road, the name belonged to a long disappeared High Street pub
  • White Hart – marked on the 1834 map and lending its name to White Hart Street off the Lower High Street, this pub survived the building of the Honeybourne railway line right past its door but was severely damaged in a bombing raid in 1941. It probably closed at that time, and the building was not rebuilt
  • White Horse – Tewkesbury Road seemingly had a pub on every corner and this one was on the corner of Cleveland Street. Along with everything else, it was swept away in the widening of Tewkesbury Road in the early 1960s. Another White Horse could once be found in Regent Place, a row of houses along Swindon Road on the site of the present Matalan store and car park
  • Whitesmith’s Arms – original name for the corner pub in Gloucester Road opposite Tesco’s car park which more recently traded as the Junction
  • White Swan – listed on 1891 census at 39 Burton Street. Now a private house
  • Wiltshire Brewery – pub and brewery in Hewlett Place. Long closed in this form, but the building survives as a private club
  • Worcester Arms – corner pub on the junction of Tewkesbury Road and Worcester Street. This area was completely destroyed in the road widening scheme of the 1960s and only a grim row of shops occupies the site today
  • York Inn – once stood in York Passage off the High Street

You can find more comprehensive information on pretty much all of these pubs and many others on the brilliant Gloucestershire Pubs website. It is my go-to site when I’m researching pubs.

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2 responses

2 11 2012
5 11 2012



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